Feininger Prints

Exhibition Review

  • "Lyonel Feininger: Master Printmaker"

  • Moeller Fine Art, New York
  • 19 Mar 2014 - 27 Jun 2014
Lyonel Feininger, Drei Tannen (Three Fir Trees) (1919), woodcut on Oriental laid paper, 8.9 x 8.3 cm. Moeller Fine Art, New York.

Lyonel Feininger, Drei Tannen (Three Fir Trees) (1919), woodcut on Oriental laid paper, 8.9 x 8.3 cm. Moeller Fine Art, New York.

More than 50 of Lyonel Feininger’s extraordinary early woodcuts from his personal collection, in pristine condition and rarely seen, were on view at Moeller Fine Art in New York earlier this year after a run at the gallery’s Berlin branch, whose permanent closure was announced in June after five years of operation. (Achim Moeller, the gallery’s director, has long represented the Feininger estate and is managing principal of the Lyonel Feininger Project, dedicated to preparing the catalogue raisonné of the artist’s paintings, maintaining the archives of his watercolors and works on paper and consulting on exhibitions of his work.) In 1919, the year after Feininger began working in woodcut, he was appointed by Walter Gropius as first “master of form” in the graphic workshop of the Bauhaus in Weimar; his famous woodcut Kathedrale was made for the cover of the Bauhaus manifesto. When the school was shut down and Feininger’s art declared “degenerate” by Nazi officials, the artist returned to the U.S., leaving some of his work stored with a family friend, Hermann Klumpp, in Quedlinburg, in what became East Germany. While most of the paintings were restored to the Feininger family in 1984, the works on view in this exhibition were only returned in 2007.

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